Renderrs' DnD Resource
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This page covers the house rules used, starting with misc rulings, to items, to feats and flaws.

Misc Rulings

These homebrewed rules tend to affect certain game mechanics

Age Effects

Geriatry Table.png

Entering a new age category grants a bonus feat, as well as an aging effect (treated similarly as a flaw) from the table. More info after the jump.

Read More: Geriatric Penalties

Grappling Chances

Mostly the same as core rules, (roll randomly to determine target when in a grapple), however it depends on the sizes of the grapplers (as well as how many of them). For instance with two medium creatures it is a 1:1 ratio, or a 50/50 chance. Small creatures and Medium Creatures both occupy 1 combat square, so they count as a size of 1. 4 Tiny creatures can fit in 1 combat square, so they have a size of 1/4(So a grapple of a tiny to med sized creature would be 1:4, tiny to large would be 1:16). Diminutive creatures have a size of 1/25. Fine Creatures have a size of 1/100. Large creatures take 4 squares, and thus have a size of 4. Huge have a size of 9. Gargantuan creatures have a size of 16. Colossal creatures have a size of 36.

Grappling Ratios
Size Size Category Size Size Category
1/100 Fine 4 Large
1/25 Diminutive 9 Huge
1/16 Tiny 16 Gargantuan
1 Small/Medium 36 Colossal

Character Flaws

Characters are permitted (but not required) to take up to two flaws at level 1. They must be rolled for as per the table.

A character may also take taint (corruption/depravity) for additional bonus feats (see HoH).

Read More: Character Flaws

Character Upbringing

  • In some campaign settings, characters must choose a background for their character during character creation.
  • In some campaign settings, an upbringing is a minor bonus determined by the backstory of the character.
  • In some campaign settings, a character archetype may be used in place of an upbringing.

Debilitating Conditions

Some wounds do not heal, and may spell the end for your character's career. A fighter that cannot see is not much better off than a peasant, after all. But this doesn't have to be the case; if magic doesn't solve the problem it is still possible for an adventurers career to continue. They have to learn to live with the affliction, however, and while they may still be afflicted they will be better able to cope with it. Debilitating conditions, and the benefits of working through them, include:

Blindness

The character cannot see. He takes a -2 penalty to Armor Class, loses his Dexterity bonus to AC (if any), moves at half speed, and takes a -4 penalty on Search checks and on most Strength- and Dexterity-based skill checks. All checks and activities that rely on vision (such as reading and Spot checks) automatically fail. All opponents are considered to have total concealment (50% miss chance) to the blinded character.

Assuming you can still hear (or have another way to perceive the world around you), after having been blind for one level you gain Blind-Fight as a bonus feat. After 3 levels of being blind, you gain Hear the Unseen (CAd) as a bonus feat.

Deafness

A deafened character cannot hear. They take a -4 penalty on initiative checks, automatically fail Listen checks, and have a 20% chance of spell failure when casting spells with verbal components.

Assuming you can still see (or have another way to perceive the world around you), after having been deaf for one level you only have a 10% chance of spell failure when casting spells with verbal components. After 3 levels of being deaf, you no longer take any penalty to initiative checks.

Digit Loss

A character may lose a number of fingers (excluding thumbs) equal to their dexterity modifier (min 1) before it starts to impact their lives. A character impacted by missing digits takes a -2 penalty to skill checks requiring fine manipulation or manual dexterity, such as Climb, Craft, Disable Device, Forgery, Hacking, Mechanics, Open Lock, Sleight of Hand, and Use Rope. A character missing a thumb cannot wield a weapon in that hand, but may still two-hand a weapon at a -2 penalty. A character with no thumbs cannot wield weapons. A character who loses a thumb takes a -2 penalty on weapon attack rolls made with their non-dominant hand until they become accustomed to it. A character may lose a number of toes equal to their dexterity modifier (min 1) before it starts to impact their lives. The impacts are less severe than missing fingers; a character missing toes takes a -2 penalty to Balance checks, Climb checks, and opposed Bull Rushes. Characters who remain digit-less for a long time grow accustomed to these drawbacks and can overcome some of them.

Assuming you still have at least one finger or toe (where applicable), after having lost those digits for one level the penalties for missing digits on skills and related checks are halved. For characters missing thumbs, it takes a variable amount of time to grow used to the new dominant hand. Characters with a base attack equal to their character level take only a week to become accustomed. Characters with a base attack less than their level but greater than half their level take two weeks, and characters with less base attack than half their level take a month to become accustomed. Once accustomed, the character takes no penalties wielding in their new dominant hand.

Dismemberment

A character who loses a limb becomes far less effective in combat if not crippled outright. Losing an arm prevents a character from dual-wielding weapons or wielding a weapon with two hands. With a missing arm, a character can only apply half of their strength bonus to strength related checks. Losing a leg slows a character by 1/2 of their land speed, they automatically fail opposed trip attacks, and they cannot avoid bull rush attacks or tramples. Losing both of either double the penalties. A character without legs is immobile, and cannot move without external interference. Characters who remain dismembered for a long time grow accustomed to these drawbacks and can overcome some of them.

A character missing only one arm eventually adapts, and after one level of missing an arm they no longer take penalties to strength related checks. A character missing a leg eventually adapts as well, and no longer automatically fail trip attempts and may avoid bull rush attacks or tramples. Assuming you have legs still, after not having arms for one level you can apply half your strength bonus to strength related checks, and you can use your feet in place of hands at a -4 penalty. After three levels of having no arms, you may use your feet in place of hands at no penalty. Assuming you have arms/hands still, after not having legs for one level you become proficient with dragging yourself along the ground; your land speed becomes 5 ft. After three levels of having no legs you become proficient with walking on your hands, and your land speed becomes 10 ft.

Mute

The character cannot speak. All skill checks that rely on speech automatically fail, though they may attempt to use body language at a -4 penalty if applicable. The character cannot cast spells with a verbal component, nor can they activate magic items with command words. Characters who remain mute for a long time grow accustomed to these drawbacks and can overcome some of them.

Assuming you still have limbs to manipulate, after having been mute for one level the penalties for using body language in place of speech is reduced to -1. After having been mute for three levels, the Silent Spell feat no longer increases the level of the spell it is applied to (but you do not gain it as a bonus feat).

Double and Triple Crit/Fail

Characters who confirm a critical hit(nat 20 only) with another nat 20, double crit, and must confirm again for the possibility of a triple crit. On a third nat 20, the target is instantly slain(assuming they are susceptible to critical hits and the max damage would not be negated by damage reduction). If anything but another 20 is rolled for the triple confirmation, the attack instead double crits as normal. (x2 weapon would do x4, x3 weapon would do x6, and x4 weapons would do x8).

Similarly, characters who confirm a crit failure(nat 1 only), with another nat 1 double fail, must draw 3 more failure cards (see below), and must roll again to confirm triple crit failure. If this is confirmed with another nat 1, your character messes up so massively that they accidentally kill themselves.

Crit Cards

Critical Hit cards are optional, Critical Failure cards are not. On a confirmed critical hit, the player has the option to draw one Critical Hit card per the weapon's crit multiplier -1. For example, a longsword crit (x2) would either have the option to deal double damage, or to draw a crit card. A weapon with a x3 crit would have the options of x3 damage, or drawing two crit cards. A crit with a x4 weapon would grant the options of dealing either: dealing x4 damage or drawing three crit cards.

Material Components

Spellcasters must account for spell material components, in the form of spell component pouches. Any material component that is not given a cost may be found in the spell pouch, which consumes a charge. Spell component pouches now have 10 charges. Spell component pouches are minorly enchanted, and seem to reach into an extraplanar pocket filled with endless supplies of lint, dust, sweat drops, and whatever other costless material components there are. This does not reflect into the cost, but a spell component pouch must be created by a caster with access to the spell "Genesis". While some are still made, most are believed to have been created by a benevolent and lazy wizard before he dispersed them around the world.

Ranger's Favored Enemy

A ranger may choose split up their favored enemy bonus as they wish between their attack rolls and their damage rolls before attacking a favored enemy. For example, a ranger with a favored enemy bonus of +2 against undead would choose to either gain a +2 to the attack roll, +2 to the damage roll, or +1 to each when attacking a zombie. Furthermore, a ranger must identify a creature as a favored enemy or they may not apply their bonus. A Ranger may make untrained knowledge checks to identify such creatures, if needed, and may apply their favored enemy bonus on such a knowledge check.

Skills

Certain skills are not covered by the default rules, and have been added as homebrewed skills. Many of these skills are based off an already existing skill, or otherwise synergize with them. Other skills are elaborated on for homebrew purposes, adding new uses or rule clarifications. Below is a compiled list of skills

Read more: Skills
  • Use Mystic Device - The Use Magic Device and Use Psionic Device skills have been combined into one.

Magic

Certain spell interactions may be up to interpretation of the DM. In such cases, they will be clarified here.

  • Grease- Magic Grease, magic fire! - the age old question; can you set stuff that's been Greased on fire for extra big dank bababooey damage? My answer has varied across campaigns but the official stance now is "heck yeah dude!", as long as the fire that ignites the grease is magical as well. If you grease and ignite an area, that area will be covered in flames. If you grease and ignite a person, that person will be on fire. If you grease and ignite an item, that item will magically transformed into licorice. Just kidding that item will be on fire. This magic fire deals damage as normal "on fire" rules dictate, and last until the grease duration ends. Have fun starting Grease fires my little monsters.
  • Reincarnate- Changed the table, more reincarnation options accounting for other humanoid races from all the splat books we have.
    Reincarnation Table.png

Some new spells have been added as well, see below.

Read More: Spells

Teamwork and Synergy

Characters who level up with a party members of the same alignment benefit greatly. This is to promote players to be on the same page, and to minimize conflicting interests between party members. The benefits are as follows.

  • For each character who shares an alignment with you, you gain half a skill point per level, rounded down.
    • So for example, in a team of 4 members, if all members are good aligned, each member gains an additional 2 skill points per level.
    • If they are also all lawful aligned, then each member would gain 4 skill points (total) per level.
    • If only 3 characters shared the same alignment, then the bonus would only be 1 (1.5 rounded down).
  • After gaining three levels where a character has gotten bonus skill points, the team must choose a bonus feat. All the members of the team then receive that feat, assuming they meet the prerequisites.
  • After gaining four levels where a character has gotten bonus skill points, and every four levels thereafter(assuming they continue getting bonus skill points) team members gain a +1 on flanking bonuses and Aid Another rolls.

Feats

Follow the link to find a compiled list of available feats from various sources, including new homebrew feats.

Read More: Feats

Some official feats have been tweaked. Below are some examples.

Weapon Finesse

Characters with the Weapon Finesse feat may add 1/2 their DEX bonus instead of their strength bonus on damage rolls with melee weapons that benefit from the Weapon Finesse feat.

Eschew Materials

Base classes that primarily cast magic spontaneously gain the Eschew Materials feat as a bonus feat at level 1. Prepared casters must still purchase spell component pouches unless they take this feat. Classes such as the Cleric and Druid, who primarily cast prepared magic but can spontaneous cast specific spells are treated as prepared casters.

Skill Theme feats

The following feats grant the associated skills as class skills to any character who takes the feat.

Items

Below are house rules regarding existing items.

  • Spell Component Pouch - Spell component pouches have 10 charges, which are consumed by spells with named material components that do not have specific costs associated with them.

Magic Items

Every magic item has an item level. In order to wield a magic item, the character must be of that level or greater. In the event that a character does not meet this minimum level, they may attempt a Use Magic Device check (DC 20 + item level) to use the item. If the item is charge based and the UMD check fails, no charge is expended but the device cannot be used for another minute. If the item is not use based and the UMD check fails, the item cannot be used for another 24 hours. A Use Magic Device check would need to be made every time the user attempts to use the item.

Scrolls

Disposable magic item prices were re-balanced. The formula to determine Scroll costs is now: Caster Level x Spell level x 20. Experience cost is now 1/20th.

Potions

Disposable magic item prices were re-balanced. The formula to determine Potion costs is now: Caster Level x Spell level x 30. Experience cost is now 1/15th.

Naming Rules

Stage Names

Upon taking a level of the Bard class, a character must choose a Stage name (Such as Blorpo: The master of the Seven Strings). While performing, that's the name they go by.

Wizard Names

Upon taking a level of the Wizard class, a character must choose a Wizard name (Such as Zoppo the Grand). They go by that name now.

Races

Several races were created by me or adapted from other sources. Most are playable, ranging from cow people to wizard clone test tube babies. Below is a compiled list of playable races, including those from official sources and homebrew.

Read More: Races==Templates==

Several templates were created by me or adapted from other sources. Some are available to anyone while others can only be obtained under specific circumstances. They range from elemental lineages to being a sentient swarm of blood droplets. Below is a compiled list of templates, including those from official sources and homebrew.

Read More: Templates
House Rules
Archetypes - Character Flaws - Geriatric Penalties - Spells


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