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Adventurers exploring the skies or islands of the world need a good ship—a vessel swift enough to go in harm’s way and sturdy enough to stand up to mighty sky monsters, terrible storms, pirate attacks, and other hazards one meets in the air. This section describes almost 30 distinct ship and boat types commonly found on the skies of the sundered world.

Vessel Characteristics

Any vehicle is an inanimate, unattended object, even if manned by hundreds of crew members. Since player characters usually rely on a ship to get them from place to place across stretches of sky and keep them from falling to their deaths when they’re in the middle of the open sky, knowing how ships are damaged and how they move is important.

Sections

Any boat or ship of Huge size or larger is not treated as a single object, but instead a composite of a number of different sections. A section is a 10-foot×10-foot×10-foot piece of a ship. Hull sections are used for recording combat damage to a ship, and serve no other purpose. A vessel 40 feet long, 10 feet in beam, and 10 feet from keel to deck has four hull sections in a line from bow to stern. It might not always be clear exactly how a small ship might be broken up into even 10-foot cubes. Consider a hull section to be roughly 1,000 cubic feet; round partial hull sections up to 1 full hull section. For example, a vessel 60 feet long, 15 feet in beam, and 15 feet from keel to deck has about 13,500 cubic feet, or 14 hull sections. You could treat such a vessel as 2 rows of 7 hull sections each. Each hull section would be about 7-1/2 feet wide, 15 feet tall, and about 8-1/2 feet long, if you ever needed to know exactly where each hull section was located. Remember, though, hull sections are intended to be an abstraction; a ship is not a big square block of uniform sections floating in the air.

In addition to the hull sections, any ballooned ship also has a number of rigging sections and balloon sections. The balloon sections might be quite large, since each one represents a portion of the balloon. The rigging is usually pretty small since it encompasses the chains and other features that connect the balloon to the ship. Destroying one section of a ship’s rigging or ballooning might damage its maneuverability, but unless the ship has only one balloon section or chain connecting, it will retain some ability to move. If all rigging sections are destroyed, the balloon detaches but unless the ship is not made of regular wood the ship won't sink immediately. Similarly, destroying the balloons won't sink the ship immediately, but the ship will be immobile unless it has propellers or another form of movement. A ballooned ship without its balloon begins the descent at 100ft per round, barring extreme circumstances.

Propulsion

While some crude rafts or barges might not have any ability to move under their own power, most vessels are designed to travel as their crews direct. This requires some sort of motive force—sails, oars, paddle-wheels, propellers, or even draft animals. The most important types are sails, oars, or propellers. Some vessels have both sails and oars.

Balloons: A ballooned ship’s speed varies with the wind conditions. As long as the vessel is steering downwind or across the wind (within 90º of downwind), its maximum speed is equal to the speed given in the vessel’s statistics block multiplied by the speed multiplier for wind strength (see Wind and Weather, Stormwrack page 22). For example, if the wind is out of the northwest, a ship sailing northeast, east, southeast, south, or southwest can move up to its maximum speed. A ballooned ship steering within 45º to 90º of the wind—north or west, in the example given here—is reduced to half speed. Finally, a ballooned ship cannot sail directly into the wind; its speed is reduced to zero if it tries to do so, although a ship can tack close to the wind and make good a course to the northwest by alternating between sailing north and sailing west, in the example above. A ballooned ship with its nose pointing into the wind isn’t stuck there forever. The helmsman can “turn in place” 45º in one full round in order to fall off the wind and begin making way again.

Propellers: Many ships are built with mechanical or magical propellers, screws, paddle-wheels, or even mechanical oars. Vessels driven by paddle-wheels or propellers ignore wind direction. They simply move their given speed in any direction the helmsman sees fit to steer.

Balloons and Propellers: Some vessels have both balloons and propellers. The ship uses either its propeller speed or its sailing speed, as the master chooses. Changing propulsion modes requires 1 full round.

Bound Elemental: Some of the more pricier ships have a bound Air or Fire elemental to the ship. This allows the ship to fly around as if it were an extension of the elemental, which is directly controlled by the helmsman. Air elementals are the faster of the two, but fire elementals have the added benefit of staying warm and dry in harsher weathers. Bound elementals typically have a personality, and are moderately aware of what goes on within the confines of their ship. Both types ignore wind direction, and simply move their given speed in any direction the helmsman sees fit to steer. Typically speaking, a ship can only have one elemental bound to it at a time, and if the ship is damaged enough to sink the elemental is destroyed alongside it. Particularly powerful elementals may survive and break free from the ship, and will likely be either pleased to be free or angry they were attacked.

Maneuverability

Boats and ships don’t turn on a copper piece and lack anything like a brake. More than one captain has been carried to disaster by virtue of the fact that he was unable to turn his ship aside from danger in time.

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  • Maximum Speed Change: The maximum amount by which the vessel can change its speed (either speeding up or slowing down) in a single round. A vessel cannot exceed its maximum speed given the current wind strength and direction.
  • Reverse: Only oared vessels can travel in reverse. A vessel cannot go backwards unless its speed was zero in the preceding round, and a vessel moving in reverse must first come to a dead stop for 1 round before moving forward again.
  • Turn: How much the vessel can turn after covering the stated distance.
  • Turn in Place: Normally, oared vessels are the only vessels that can turn in place. The vessel must begin the round with a speed of zero to turn in place. A sailing ship can turn in place only when its speed is zero and its bow is pointing into the wind (the ship raises enough sail to fall off the wind and assume a new direction that will permit it to sail in the following round).
  • Maximum Turn: How much the vessel can turn in any one space.

Statistics

Each of the vessels presented in this chapter includes a short statistics block describing the vessel. A ship’s statistics block includes the following entries.

  • Size: The size of the vehicle, using the same size categories as creatures do.
  • Skyworthiness: The ship’s overall sturdiness. This modifier is applied to any Profession (pilot) checks the captain or master makes in order to avoid sinking and other hazards that large, well-built vessels avoid more easily than small and frail ones.
  • Shiphandling: The ship’s agility and nimbleness. This modifier is applied to Profession (pilot) checks the captain or master makes in order to avoid collisions, come about, sail close to the wind, and other situations that small, swift vessels avoid more easily than large and clumsy ones.
  • Speed: The ship’s speed and its maneuverability rating.
  • Wind: Sailing vessels have a base speed, which is then modified by the wind strength. For example, a ship with a speed of “wind×15 feet” has a speed of 15 feet if the wind speed modifier is ×1, 30 feet if the modifier is ×2, or 45 feet if the modifier is ×3. See Wind and Weather, Stormwrack page 22.
  • Propellers: The ship’s speed while being using propellers.
  • Overall AC: The AC of the ship as a whole. Ships of Huge size or larger rarely use this, since an attacker targets a single hull section at a time when attacking a Huge or larger ship.
  • Hull Sections: The number of hull sections the ship possesses.
  • Sink: The number of destroyed hull sections necessary to sink the ship outright. A ship can sink from the destruction of a single hull section, but it is not automatic.
  • Section hp: The number of hit points and the hardness of each hull section.
  • Section AC: The Armor Class of each hull section.
  • Rigging Sections: The number of rigging sections the ship possesses. Generally, each rigging section is equal to one chain segment.
  • Rigging hp: The number of hit points and the hardness of each rigging section.
  • Balloon Sections: The number of balloon sections the ship possesses. Generally the sections are consolidated into what appears to be one large balloon, but internally is composed into segments.
  • Balloon hp: The number of hit points and the hardness of each balloon section.
  • Ram: The damage dealt by the vehicle per 10 feet of speed it currently possesses if it rams another object. For example, a ship with a base ram damage of 3d6 deals 3d6 points of damage if moving at a speed of 10 feet, 6d6 at a speed of 20 feet, 9d6 at a speed of 30 feet, and so on.
  • Mounts: The number of weapons the ship can mount. A light mount is suitable for a ballista or light mounted gun turret; a heavy mount is suitable for a catapult or cannon.
  • Space: The length and width of the area taken up by the ship.
  • Complement: The number of crew members, passengers, and soldiers who can be carried by the vessel for extended voyaging. For a short voyage (a day or less) a ship might be able to cram two or three times this number of people on board.
  • Watch: The number of crew members necessary to make course changes, adjust for wind changes, and generally handle the ship. Usually the watch consists of a helmsman, a lookout or two, and a small number of deckhands who can go aloft to work on the balloons and fins as necessary. On a man-powered vessel, the watch includes the number of crew necessary for the ship to make use of its full speed.
  • Cargo: The capacity of the vehicle’s hold, in tons (1 ton = 2,000 pounds). Most ships are slowed to 3/4 normal speed if carrying half this load or more.
  • Cost: The vehicle’s cost in gold pieces.

Vessels

The following boats and ships are only a small sample of the types most typically found in the skies of a fantasy world.

  • Complement: The first number in this entry is the ship’s complement, or the total number of Small or Medium humanoids that can normally be carried on board as crew and passengers. The second number is the ship’s watch requirement, or the minimum number of people necessary to control the ship without penalty. The third number, when present, indicates the number of crew required in addition to the normal watch; a man-powered ship doesn’t need peddlers to sail, but does need peddlers to use its movement rate.
  • Speed: The ship’s sailing speed. Sailing vessels have an asterisked speed entry, since the actual sailing speed varies with the wind speed and direction.
  • Cost: The ship’s cost in gold pieces.
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Aegis

Protected from enemy fire by solid iron plate, the aegis is slow and clumsy but deadly in a aerial battle. The aegis is built on a frame of thick wooden timbers, just like most other vessels; armor is then riveted or bolted onto its sides. Most aegis' are built by skyfaring dwarves who turn their remarkable knack for metallurgy and engineering to the construction of these warships.

  • Aegis: Colossal vehicle; Skyworthiness -2; Shiphandling -4; Speed wind × 10 ft. or propellers 10 ft. (poor); Overall AC –3; Hull sections 72(sink 60 sections); Section hp 150 (hardness 10); Section AC 3; Rigging Sections 2; Rigging hp 60 (hardness 0), AC 6; Balloon Sections 80; Balloon hp 40 (hardness 0) AC 1; Ram 6d6; Mounts 8 light and 2 heavy; Space 80 ft. by 30 ft.; Complement 120; Watch 5; Cargo 20 tons; Cost 50,000 gp.

Aeravel

The caravel is a skyworthy, nimble ship that can handle long journeys. It has a small forecastle and sterncastle, and a large balloon. A caravel is a smooth-hulled, full-decked vessel built on a strong internal frame. It is a relatively advanced design, and not every air faring peoples have the skills and knowledge to build one.

  • Aeravel: Colossal vehicle; Skyworthiness +4; Shiphandling +2; Speed wind × 40 ft. (average); Overall AC –3; Hull sections 24(sink 6 sections); Section hp 80 (hardness 5); Section AC 3; Rigging Sections 3; Rigging hp 80 (hardness 0), AC 1; Balloon Sections 64; Balloon hp 40 (hardness 0) AC 1; Ram 4d6; Mounts 2 light and 1 heavy; Space 60 ft. by 20 ft.; Complement 30; Watch 2 plus 5 crew; Cargo 90 tons (Speed wind × 15 ft. if 60 tons or more); Cost 10,000 gp.

Biplane

Sometimes called the dragonfly, the biplane is a fixed-wing aircraft with two main wings stacked one above the other. It relies on a face-mounted animated propeller to propel up to two medium-sized creatures through the air. Similar to the hang glider, the biplane gives its pilot and gunner concealment behind 1 inch of wood and cloth (hp 10, hardness 3). The biplane can mount a (smaller than typical) light mounted weapon, or two medium-sized heavy guns (such as a magic missile launcher). Biplanes are exclusively produced by the Legion of United Islands, but some have been sold to neighboring nations.

A biplane is too small to have different hull sections, and therefore only has an overall AC and a single hp total for the hull.

  • Biplane: Large vehicle; Skyworthiness +2; Shiphandling +4; Speed propellers 40 ft (poor); Overall AC 5; Hull hp 40 (hardness 5); Ram 1d6; Mounts 1 light or 2 mounted guns; Space 15 ft. by 20 ft.; Complement 2; Watch 1 plus 1 gunner; Cargo 75 lbs; Cost 5,250 gp.

Blimp

A blimp, or non-rigid airship, is an airship without an internal structural framework or a keel. Unlike semi-rigid and rigid airships (e.g. Zeppelins), blimps rely on the pressure of the lifting gas (usually wizelium, rather than wizogen) inside the envelope and the strength of the envelope itself to maintain its shape.

  • Blimp: Gargantuan vehicle; Skyworthiness -1; Shiphandling +0; Speed wind × 15 ft. or propellers 15 ft. (poor); Overall AC 1; Hull sections 2(sink 1 section); Section hp 60 (hardness 5); Section AC 3; Balloon Sections 16; Balloon hp 40 (hardness 0) AC 1; Ram --; Mounts 1 light; Space 30 ft. by 20 ft.; Complement 20; Watch 1 plus 1 engineer, 3 crew; Cargo 30 tons (Speed wind × 10 ft. or propellers 10 ft. if 15 tons or more); Cost 4,500 gp.

Dirigible

A smaller version of the zeppelin, the dirigible also relies on animated propellers to push it through the air. Wizards sometimes build dirigibles to ferry important underlings from place to place. Like zeppelins, dirigibles have no minimum forward speed, and they can hover if they are turned into the wind.

  • Dirigible: Colossal vehicle; Skyworthiness +1; Shiphandling -2; Speed wind × 15 ft.or propellers 20 ft. (poor); Overall AC –3; Hull sections 6(sink 4 sections); Section hp 80 (hardness 5); Section AC 3; Balloon Sections 128; Balloon hp 40 (hardness 0) AC 1; Ram --; Mounts 2 light; Space 100 ft. by 20 ft.; Complement 60; Watch 3 plus 2 engineers, 14 crew; Cargo 70 tons (Speed wind × 10 ft. or 15 ft. propellers if 35 tons or more); Cost 10,000 gp.

Dragon Ship

Clad in decorative steel into the shapes of mythical beasts, the dragonship is an aircraft unique to the island of Tetshasu. Not all are shaped like dragons, but most are which is where the name comes from. These heavily armored behemoths are equipped with many defenses, and while slow they are quite deadly in aerial combat. The mouths of the ships can shoot gouts of flames, which is particularly devastating to wooden ships. Since they're from a mostly hidden and isolationist island, very few skylanders even know of their existence.

  • Dragon Ship: Colossal vehicle; Skyworthiness +4; Shiphandling -4; Speed propellers 20 ft. (poor); Overall AC –3; Hull sections 120(sink 60 sections); Section hp 80 (hardness 5); Section AC 3; Ram 6d6; Mounts 10 light and 3 heavy; Space 100 ft. by 40 ft.; Complement 200; Watch 8 plus 6 engineers, 10 crew; Cargo 200 tons; Cost 75,000 gp.

Dreadnought

Clad in protective steel plating, this monstrous ship is the de facto flagship for most naval commanders. These heavily armored behemoths are equipped with many defenses, and and are equally quite deadly in aerial combat.

  • Dreadnought: Colossal vehicle; Skyworthiness +6; Shiphandling -5; Speed propellers 25 ft. (poor); Overall AC –3; Hull sections 250(sink 220 sections); Section hp 120 (hardness 10); Section AC 3; Ram 8d6; Mounts 20 light and 10 heavy; Space 180 ft. by 40 ft.; Complement 1,000; Watch 30 plus 10 engineers, 10 crew; Cargo 700 tons; Cost 120,000 gp.

Gnomish Guncopter

A contraption resembling a flying bicycle with a gun turret, the gnomish guncopter relies on animated propellers to propel up to two small sized characters through the air. It can ascend like a flying creature with poor maneuverability, and can hover in place. Like the hang glider the ornithopter gives its pilot concealment behind 1 inch of wood and cloth (hp 10, hardness 3), but not the gunner. The guncopter can mount a (smaller than typical) light mounted weapon, or a regular sized heavy gun (like a magic missile launcher).

A gnomish guncopter is too small to have different hull sections, and therefore only has an overall AC and a single hp total for the hull.

  • Gnomish Guncopter: Large vehicle; Skyworthiness +2; Shiphandling +4; Speed propellers 30 ft (poor); Overall AC 5; Hull hp 40 (hardness 5); Ram 1d6; Mounts 1 light; Space 10 ft. by 20 ft.Complement 2; Watch 1 plus 1 gunner; Cargo 50 lbs; Cost 4,000 gp.

Gunboat

A gunboat is an aircraft designed for the express purpose of carrying one or more guns to bombard coastal targets, as opposed to those military craft designed for aerial warfare, or for ferrying troops or supplies. Gunboats are often carried by larger ships for use in landing in places where the larger ship can’t go.

A gunboat is too small to have different hull sections, and therefore only has an overall AC and a single hp total for the hull.

  • Gunboat: Large vehicle; Skyworthiness +0; Shiphandling +3; Speed propellers 35 ft. (good); Overall AC 4; Hull hp 60 (hardness 5); Ram 1d6; Mounts 1 light; Space 15 ft. by 10 ft.; Complement 4; Watch 1 plus 1 gunner; Cargo 1000 lbs (Speed paddle 5 ft. if 500 lbs or more); Cost 10,000 gp.

Gunship

The gunship is a nimble mid-range ship, capable of traversing moderate distances such as island-to-island trips and empire-wide excursions. Gunships are often used when scouting hostile environments, escorting other ships, or even transporting small teams. While not particularly large, they are designed to be very space efficient and accommodate armaments easily.

  • Sky Sloop: Huge vehicle; Skyworthiness +0; Shiphandling +2; Speed wind × 30 ft. (good); Overall AC 4; Hull sections 3(sink 1 sections); Section hp 50 (hardness 5); Section AC 3; Rigging Sections 3; Rigging hp 60 (hardness 0), AC 8; Balloon Sections 8; Balloon hp 40 (hardness 0) AC 1; Ram 3d6; Mounts 2 light; Space 30 ft. by 15 ft.; Complement 12; Watch 1 plus 2 gunners; Cargo 60 tons (Speed wind × 15 ft. if 30 tons or more); Cost 20,000 gp.

Hang Glider

This big, wedge-shaped wing consists of a rigid frame with canvas, animal hides, or some other light, sturdy covering spread tightly across it. Unlike most flying vehicles, a hang glider cannot ascend under its own power. Hang gliders rely on either a high launch point or thermal updrafts to gain altitude. A hang glider’s pilot gains concealment behind 1 inch of wood and cloth (hp 10, hardness 3). Hang gliders are often carried by larger ships for uses in leisure and scouting.

A hang glider is too small to have different hull sections, and therefore only has an overall AC and a single hp total for the hull.

  • Hang Glider: Large vehicle; Skyworthiness +0; Shiphandling +4; Speedwind x 30 ft. (poor); Overall AC 4; Hull hp 20 (hardness 5); Ram 1d6; Mounts --; Space 5 ft. by 15 ft.Complement 1; Watch 1; Cargo 25 lbs; Cost 50 gp.

Hot Air Balloon

A hot air balloon is a lighter than air aircraft consisting of a bag, called an envelope, which contains heated air. Suspended beneath is a gondola or wicker basket (in some long-distance or high-altitude balloons, a capsule), which carries passengers and (usually) a source of heat, in most cases an open flame. The heated air inside the envelope makes it buoyant since it has a lower density than the colder air outside the envelope. As with all aircraft, hot air balloons cannot fly beyond the atmosphere. Unlike gas balloons, the envelope does not have to be sealed at the bottom, since the air near the bottom of the envelope is at the same pressure as the surrounding air. Hot air balloons are completely at the mercy of the winds and are usually used for leisure more than for practical transportation.

A hot air balloon is too small to have different hull sections, and therefore only has an overall AC and a single hp total for the hull.

  • Hot Air Balloon: Huge vehicle; Skyworthiness -3; Shiphandling +0; Speed wind × 15 ft. (poor); Overall AC –3; Hull hp 30 (hardness 5); Rigging Sections 2; Rigging hp 40 (hardness 0), AC 8; Balloon Sections 8; Balloon hp 20 (hardness 0) AC 1; Ram --; Mounts --; Space 10 ft. by 10 ft.; Complement 6; Watch 1; Cargo 500 lbs (Speed wind × 10 ft. if 250 lbs or more); Cost 1,000 gp.

Keeler

This flat-bottomed boat is fully decked, with a large deckhouse that takes up most of the boat’s center or stern depending on the design. It is often used to transport goods above the rooftops in the cities.

  • Keeler: Gargantuan vehicle; Skyworthiness -2; Shiphandling +2; Speed wind × 10 ft.or propellers 10 ft. (good); Overall AC 1; Hull sections 3(sink 1 section); Section hp 50 (hardness 5); Section AC 3; Rigging Sections 2; Rigging hp 60 (hardness 0), AC 8; Balloon Sections 16; Balloon hp 40 (hardness 0) AC 1; Ram 3d6; Mounts 1 light; Space 30 ft. by 10 ft.; Complement 16; Watch 1 plus 1 engineer, 4 crew; Cargo 20 tons (Speed wind × 5 ft. or propellers 5 ft. if 10 tons or more); Cost 3,000 gp.

Logship

The logship is the probably simplest boat possible—a hollowed-out soarwood log hacked into the shape of a boat.

A logship is too small to have different hull sections, and therefore only has an overall AC and a single hp total for the hull.

  • Logship: Large vehicle; Skyworthiness -3; Shiphandling +1; Speed paddle 10 ft. (good); Overall AC 4; Hull hp 40 (hardness 5); Ram 1d6; Mounts --; Space 10 ft. by 5 ft.; Complement 4; Watch 1; Cargo 500 lbs; Cost 100 gp.

Ornithopter

A magically enhanced version of the hang glider, the ornithopter relies on animated wings to propel a character through the air. Thus it can ascend like any flying creature with poor maneuverability. Like the hang glider, the ornithopter gives its pilot concealment behind 1 inch of wood and cloth (hp 10, hardness 3).

An ornithopter is too small to have different hull sections, and therefore only has an overall AC and a single hp total for the hull.

  • Ornithopter: Large vehicle; Skyworthiness +2; Shiphandling +4; Speed propellers 40 ft (poor); Overall AC 4; Hull hp 20 (hardness 5); Ram 2d6; Mounts --; Space 5 ft. by 15 ft.Complement 1; Watch 1; Cargo 35 lbs; Cost 2,000 gp.

Paddleboat

Sometimes called a punt, a paddleboat is a small craft used to transport people and goods to and from the ship when it isn't docked. Paddleboats are often carried by larger ships for use in landing in places where the larger ship can’t go. This ship is man-powered, utilizing the pedalling of it's riders to power propellers.

A paddleboat is too small to have different hull sections, and therefore only has an overall AC and a single hp total for the hull.

  • Paddleboat: Large vehicle; Skyworthiness -4; Shiphandling +2; Speed paddle 10 ft. (good); Overall AC 4; Hull hp 30 (hardness 5); Ram 1d6; Mounts --; Space 10 ft. by 5 ft.; Complement 4; Watch 1; Cargo 1000 lbs (Speed paddle 5 ft. if 500 lbs or more); Cost 50 gp.

Radsub

Named after the aquatic submersible, the radsub was designed for excursions into the cloud sea. It is completely encapsulated, with the only entrance being a hatch that leads to an airlock. The hull is plated with protective lead shielding, and the interior machinery includes air scrubbers to ensure the crew is safe from radiation. While inside, the crew is completely safe from all but the most radioactive environments. This ship is primarily used for scientific purposes.

  • Radsub: Colossal vehicle; Skyworthiness +4; Shiphandling -4; Spd propellers 15 ft. (poor); Overall AC –3; Hull sections 80 (sink 60 sections); Section hp 90 (hardness 8); Section AC 3; Ram 6d6; Mounts 2 light and 1 heavy; Space 70 ft. by 20 ft.; Complement 15; Watch 8 plus 2 engineers; Cargo 20 tons; Cost 80,000 gp.

Raft

While almost anyone can lash a few soarwood logs together and make a crude raft, this is a vessel made of sawn soarwood planks with logs or wizelium filled barrels for lift. The raft normally has a small deckhouse or flat for shelter. It is slow and hard to maneuver, but is relatively simple to build if you have the proper materials.

A raft is too small to have different hull sections, and therefore only has an overall AC and a single hp total for the hull.

  • Raft: Huge vehicle; Skyworthiness -4; Shiphandling +0; Speed paddle 5 ft. (poor); Overall AC 3; Hull hp 30 (hardness 5); Ram 2d6; Mounts --; Space 15 ft. by 10 ft.; Complement 8; Watch 1 plus 2 paddlers; Cargo 2 tons (Speed paddles 5 ft. if 1 tons or more); Cost 100 gp.

Sky Barge

A sky barge is not much more than a large, flat-bottomed hull designed to haul heavy cargoes by air. Most sky barges are intended to be towed by other ships or by teams of draft animals, but some are fitted out as royal yachts or war barges. Sky barges of this sort might have large deckhouses or weapon mounts. Sky barges are best employed on calm days, where strong winds are not an issue.

  • Sky Barge: Colossal vehicle; Skyworthiness +0; Shiphandling -6; Speed propellers 5 ft. (poor) or drawn; Overall AC –3; Hull sections 80(sink 20 sections); Section hp 50 (hardness 5); Section AC 3; Ram 6d6; Mounts 2 light and 2 heavy; Space 100 ft. by 40 ft.; Complement 120; Watch 3 plus 15 crew; Cargo 250 tons; Cost 6,000 gp.

Sky Skiff

Sky skiffs are small speedy crafts which utilize motorized propellers. They are often used in the same manner as a paddleboat, but since they don't need to be manually powered they are seen as more luxurious and high-brow. They can cover short distances quickly, and are often used to visit nearby satellite islands, sky hunting, and zipping around the city. Sky skiffs are often carried by larger ships for use in landing in places where the larger ship can’t go.

A sky skiff is too small to have different hull sections, and therefore only has an overall AC and a single hp total for the hull.

  • Sky Skiff: Large vehicle; Skyworthiness +0; Shiphandling +4; Speedpropellers 30 ft (good); Overall AC 4; Hull hp 50 (hardness 5)Ram 1d6; Mounts --; Space 15 ft. by 10 ft.; Complement 6; Watch 1; Cargo 1 ton; Cost 3,000 gp.

Sky Sloop

Larger than the sky skiff, the sky sloop is a more of an "upper crust" craft used for similar purposes. Too large to be used as a paddleboat replacement, sky sloops are capable of longer range travel and can be used without a larger craft. The upper middle class is known to utilize these ships as trophy items and status symbols.

  • Sky Sloop: Huge vehicle; Skyworthiness +0; Shiphandling +2; Speed wind × 30 ft. (good); Overall AC 4; Hull sections 3(sink 1 sections); Section hp 50 (hardness 5); Section AC 3; Rigging Sections 3; Rigging hp 60 (hardness 0), AC 8; Balloon Sections 8; Balloon hp 40 (hardness 0) AC 1; Ram 3d6; Mounts 1 light; Space 30 ft. by 15 ft.; Complement 12; Watch 1 plus 2 crew; Cargo 60 tons (Speed wind × 15 ft. if 30 tons or more); Cost 7,000 gp.

Skycastle

Fitted with a towering forecastle and sterncastle, this huge, broad-beamed ship is almost a literally a flying castle. It has four massive mechanical wings, large propellers and is not remotely nimble, but it is large and sturdy and can carry hundreds of sailors and soldiers. It has multiple decks, and the central tower often has one or more fighting tops, small platforms suitable for gunmen to fire down at other ships.

  • Skycastle: Colossal vehicle; Skyworthiness +6; Shiphandling -4; Speed propellers 25 ft. (poor); Overall AC –3; Hull sections 240(sink 200 sections); Section hp 80 (hardness 5); Section AC 3; Ram 6d6; Mounts 12 light and 4 heavy; Space 80 ft. by 80 ft.; Complement 500; Watch 20; Cargo 500 tons; Cost 60,000 gp.

Sorne

Named after the elven word for "bird", the sorne is the fastest ship in the skies. It sports a thing angular shape, and several massive mechanical wings. Despite its graceful lines and delicate appearance, the sorne is actually quite sturdily built and deadly in an aerial battle. Elves rarely (if ever) sell sornes to non-elves.

  • Sorne: Colossal vehicle; Skyworthiness +4; Shiphandling +4; Speed wind × 60 ft. or wings 50 ft. (good); Overall AC –3; Hull sections 12(sink 3 sections); Section hp 150 (hardness 6); Section AC 3; Rigging Sections 4; Rigging hp 80 (hardness 0), AC 1; Balloon Sections 80; Balloon hp 40 (hardness 0) AC 1; Ram 4d6; Mounts 2 light and 1 heavy; Space 60 ft. by 10 ft.; Complement 30; Watch 1 plus 1 engineer, 4 crew; Cargo 30 tons (Speed wind × 30 ft. or wings 25 ft. if 15 tons or more); Cost 40,000 gp.

Sprocket

The sprocket is the basic sky islands ballooned ship. It is a single ballooned ship with a round, sturdy hull. It has a partial deck (the waist of the ship is not decked over, but the ends are) and raised bow and stern platforms that are open, as opposed to being enclosed like a true forecastle or sterncastle. It is skyworthy, but not very handy in adverse winds.

  • Sprocket: Colossal vehicle; Skyworthiness +2; Shiphandling -2; Speed wind × 20 ft. (poor); Overall AC –3; Hull sections 16(sink 4 sections); Section hp 80 (hardness 5); Section AC 3; Rigging Sections 4; Rigging hp 80 (hardness 0), AC 8; Balloon Sections 64; Balloon hp 40 (hardness 0) AC 1; Ram 4d6; Mounts 1 light and 1 heavy; Space 40 ft. by 20 ft.; Complement 20; Watch 4; Cargo 40 tons (Speed wind × 10 ft. if 20 tons or more); Cost 6,000 gp.

Theurgible

The theurgible is a vessel powered by magic. Without sails, balloons, or paddles it moves swiftly and tirelessly across the skies. Theurgibles can be powered in a variety of ways, but the most common design is a set of mechanical propellers turned or driven by a magical construct, mindless undead, or even a bound elemental. Many theurgibles are luxuriously appointed with comfortable cabins and exotic décor, as befits the wealthy wizards who most likely own such vessels.

  • Theurgible: Colossal vehicle; Skyworthiness +2; Shiphandling +2; Speed propellers 35 ft (perfect); Overall AC –3; Hull sections 28(sink 7 sections); Section hp 150 (hardness 6); Section AC 3; Ram 4d6; Mounts 4 light, 2 heavy; Space 70 ft. by 20 ft.; Complement 40; Watch 1; Cargo 100 tons (Speed propellers 20 ft. if 50 tons or more); Cost 80,000 gp.

Triplane

Sturdier than the biplane, the triplane is a fixed-wing aircraft with three main wings stacked one above the other. It relies on a face-mounted animated propeller to propel up to two medium-sized creatures through the air. The biplane gives its pilot and gunner concealment behind 1 inch of wood and cloth (hp 10, hardness 3). The biplane can mount a (smaller than typical) light mounted weapon and two medium-sized heavy guns (such as a magic missile launcher). Triplanes are primarily produced by the Bellic Empire, being reverse engineered from Legion biplanes.

A biplane is too small to have different hull sections, and therefore only has an overall AC and a single hp total for the hull.

  • Biplane: Huge vehicle; Skyworthiness +3; Shiphandling +3; Speed propellers 35 ft (poor); Overall AC 4; Hull hp 50 (hardness 8); Ram 1d6; Mounts 1 light and 2 mounted guns; Space 15 ft. by 20 ft.; Complement 2; Watch 1 plus 1 gunner; Cargo 100 lbs; Cost 10,500 gp.

Tugboat

Small but powerful, the tugboat is the go-to ship for towing larger and less maneuverable ships. The tugboat utilizes animated propellers for movement, and can pull most ships behind it with ease. Tugboats can pull a weight of up to 500 tons, slowing to half speed if pulling more than 250 tons. In cases where a ship may be too heavy for a single tugboat to pull, teams of tugboats may be used to distribute the weight.

  • Tugboat: Gargantuan vehicle; Skyworthiness +2; Shiphandling +2; Speed propellers 20 ft. (good); Overall AC –3; Hull sections 10(sink 6 sections); Section hp 70 (hardness 5); Section AC 3; Ram 4d6; Mounts 1 light and 1 heavy; Space 40 ft. by 20 ft.; Complement 20; Watch 1 plus 2 crew; Cargo 30 tons; Cost 5,000 gp.

Warballoon

This is the largest man-powered vessel normally built. It is fully decked, with a complicated arrangement of pedaling stations in multiple banks. It is capable of carrying hundreds of sailors, soldiers, and tons of equipment. Warballoons are usually warships, vessels whose primary purpose is service in a fleet.

  • Warballoon: Colossal vehicle; Skyworthiness +1; Shiphandling +0; Speed wind × 15 ft.or paddle 20 ft. (average); Overall AC –3; Hull sections 80(sink 40 sections); Section hp 60 (hardness 5); Section AC 3; Rigging Sections 8; Rigging hp 80 (hardness 0), AC 6; Balloon Sections 256; Balloon hp 40 (hardness 0) AC 1; Ram 6d6; Mounts 6 light and 3 heavy; Space 130 ft. by 20 ft.; Complement 400; Watch 10 plus 160 paddlers; Cargo 150 tons (Speed wind × 10 ft. or 15 ft. paddles if 75 tons or more); Cost 30,000 gp.

Warblimp

Unlike the blimp which is a non-rigid ballooned airship, the warblimp is a medium-sized warballoon that is fast, nimble, and eminently suitable for warfare. It has two balloons can sail better than it paddles with any kind of favorable wind. It is fully decked, and the paddlers are covered from attack. The warblimp usually has a small deckhouse or fighting platform at the stern. The warblimp is the most advanced warballoon design, and not many sky faring folk have the expertise and skills to build it.

  • Warblimp: Colossal vehicle; Skyworthiness +0; Shiphandling +1; Speed wind × 20 ft.or paddle 30 ft. (average); Overall AC –3; Hull sections 60(sink 30 sections); Section hp 60 (hardness 5); Section AC 3; Rigging Sections 4; Rigging hp 80 (hardness 0), AC 8; Balloon Sections 128; Balloon hp 40 (hardness 0) AC 1; Ram 4d6; Mounts 4 light and 2 heavy; Space 100 ft. by 20 ft.; Complement 200; Watch 5 plus 100 paddlers; Cargo 150 tons (Speed wind × 10 ft. or 15 ft. paddles if 75 tons or more); Cost 25,000 gp.

Whaleboat

The whaleboat is a large, open dinghy with a stout, round-bottomed hull that can stand up to surprisingly rough winds. Whaleboats are often carried by larger ships for use in landing in places where the larger ship can’t go. Rather simplistic in design, aspiring whale hunters typically utilize this ship to hunt soarwhales and other large flying creatures.

A whaleboat is too small to have different hull sections, and therefore only has an overall AC and a single hp total for the hull.

  • Whaleboat: Huge vehicle; Skyworthiness +0; Shiphandling +2; Speed paddle 15 ft. (good); Overall AC 3; Hull hp 50 (hardness 5)Ram 2d6; Mounts --; Space 15 ft. by 5 ft.; Complement 8; Watch 1 plus 2 paddlers; Cargo 4 tons (Speed paddles 10 ft. if 2 tons or more); Cost 500 gp.

Whirligig

Essentially a flying tandem bicycle, a whirligig is a small personal aircraft designed for leisurely strolls around the city and in some cases around the island. Powered by the pedaling of its two passengers, the whirligig sports a large central propeller and a pair of mechanical wings. A favorite method of travel of the Luddites, some models are known to be welded together into longer tandems allowing for many people to power the craft.

A whirligig is too small to have different hull sections, and therefore only has an overall AC and a single hp total for the hull.

  • Whirligig: Large vehicle; Skyworthiness -4; Shiphandling +0; Speed paddle 10 ft. (good); Overall AC 5; Hull hp 10 (hardness 5); Ram --; Mounts --; Space 10 ft. by 5 ft.; Complement 2; Watch 1; Cargo 100 lbs; Cost 75 gp.

Yacht

The go-to symbol of wealth, the yacht is typically a leisure craft for the elite members of society. It is capable of long range travel, and larger than the sky sloop. It is speedy, stylish, and functional.

  • Yacht: Gargantuan vehicle; Skyworthiness +2; Shiphandling +2; Speed wind × 30 ft.or propellers 35 ft. (good); Overall AC –3; Hull sections 10(sink 6 sections); Section hp 70 (hardness 5); Section AC 3; Rigging Sections 3; Rigging hp 60 (hardness 0), AC 8; Balloon Sections 16; Balloon hp 40 (hardness 0) AC 1; Ram 4d6; Mounts 2 light and 1 heavy; Space 40 ft. by 20 ft.; Complement 25; Watch 1 plus 2 crew; Cargo 60 tons (Speed wind × 15 ft. or propellers 25 ft. if 30 tons or more); Cost 15,000 gp.

Zeppelin

A zeppelin relies on hot air trapped in a massive balloon for lift and animated propellers for propulsion. Because it's massive balloon, it is light in weight and vulnerable to wind conditions. The balloon that provides lift is segmented so that one puncture isn’t disastrous. Unlike creatures with less than perfect maneuverability, zeppelins have no minimum forward speed, and they can hover if they are turned into the wind.

  • Zeppelin: Colossal vehicle; Skyworthiness +2; Shiphandling -4; Speed wind × 15 ft.or propellers 20 ft. (poor); Overall AC –3; Hull sections 12(sink 10 sections); Section hp 80 (hardness 5); Section AC 3; Balloon Sections 200; Balloon hp 40 (hardness 0) AC 1; Ram --; Mounts 3 light and 2 heavy; Space 200 ft. by 25 ft.; Complement 100; Watch 3 plus 4 engineers, 21 crew; Cargo 150 tons (Speed wind × 10 ft. or 15 ft. propellers if 35 tons or more); Cost 21,000 gp.

Gallery

Air Transportation
Basics - Vessels - Armaments and Accessories - Personal Equipment - Ship Magic
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